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to be done about it. >> more afghans thought the election was -- had been very corrupt and had been very satisfied with the result. so they can hold both concepts that are the media, which seems able to do. we recently did a study assumes to press against any and embarrass perspective. we looked at 20 post conflict read election conflicts, peacekeeping and peace enforcement efforts, the biggest fear -- the big enforcement efforts. the monthly smaller u. n ones and a dozen or more other places. we evaluated them on and at the of places. also, did they approach of the democratization and freedom house chorus to rank them. did they produce of the government, we used indices and they rick every government in the world. did the economy expanded? did did the citizens improved and the nearly use the human development index which looks of both levels of in, but also education and health and other criteria. in democratization, afghanistan did not pass the test. that is definitely a failure. it was about the metal in terms of how much of it was democratized. but in to a government effectiveness, i
than two months left before the election and in many ways this was the time this book was designed for because it's winter these last two months, this is when the election really gets going and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it's obama versus karl rove. he is in behind-the-scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months and we in new york are not going to see much of it. it will be spent in the battleground states. and he has becomes the king of the super pacs. when you put together his money with the money that romney has raised and the republican national committee has a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in perspective and no eight, mccain had $375 million to spend so this is a factor of five and you will start seeing it coming out now. and the other thing i wanted to discuss about him is who is he really and what does he do? yes a political operative. how does he operate? what does he really do? i talked to a couple of sources about that and one who is one of several who has
i wasn't elected to come here just to stand in the way of everything. there are republicans who want to do serious things. on debt. on immigration. they know that the party has a huge problem with hispanics that they have to fix. >> and the other flip side of this is you've been hearing some paranoia from republicans is another way you can crack the republican party or split them is by forcing them to take those things like taxes, and then perhaps leading to a primary challenge for those republicans who voted in favor of higher taxes. chris: somebody on the hard right then? >> as we saw in recent elections democrats have a pretty good track record in general elections against some of these fringe candidates. chris: well said. >> chuck hagel. big discussions. unlike with susan rice where she hung fire for weeks and was dropped, or she dropped herself, this time he stuck with hagel after all the heat against him on -- some from the gays and the left and the neo-cons and where is he heading? put a guy out there in your face as howard said? >> he thinks that he can win. first of all it w
davis ever when an actual election? >> he was a senator. wesson elections were -- and he was nominated in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democ
if that blows some fuses in germany. >> 2013 is a so-called super election-year in austria, meaning that voters will go to the polls several times. regional parliaments are due to be elected in four of the country's states ts sprg, followed by the national election of the federal parliament this autumn. it will not be an easy campaign for the traditional parties. they face competition from a political newcomer. some austrian politicians are reminded of a time in the early 1990's when a man came from the far right and meddled with the traditional austrian political landscape. he died four years ago, and his party has since lost some of its significance, but some former supporters have now found a new political home with a new party. >> he who has the gold makes the rules -- that was the model used when introducing the party in the timber. he was born into a poor family in austria but went to canada to make his millions. now he has returned to make a dramatic entrance on the political scene. >> i am certain that this is a very important day that will go down iaustan history. i also think it will
a senator. said he would only serve two terms. only served two terms. and when he was elected the second time, he was elected with 83% of the vote. this is a guy respected by his fellow citizens of nebraska. served here for a total of 12 years. and what did he do when he left the senate? he came became an ac testimony knick georgetown, school of foreign service, teaching the new leaders. he also has been co-chairman of the president's intelligence advisory board. he is alsos on the defense policy board. this is a gentleman who knows all of these issues in depth. he is a fellow who speaks his mind. he sometimes gets in trouble with those who think he should not speak his mind but he says what he believes and he sticks with t so the issues that are being raised now are important issues and that's why we have a confirmation hearing and i'm sure that chuck will be able to deal with those issues at the hearing. >> let's go through a few of them. >> all right. >> he failed to label iran's revolutionary guard a terror organization, advocated direct talks with iran which have not borne fruit and
as the historical event over 200 years ago is written about and talked about and people who are up for election? was this just an inevitable outgrowth of our part of the culture that talks about these issues this way? >> guest: i think to a large extent yes and if you look historically, it hasn't changed much over even the last 200 years. this kind of eerie propagandistic view of history. even while that history was being made, people were very propagandist. people were propagandist about washington and jefferson and what they meant. so yes, i do think that's part of the genre. and i think that part of the genre needs to be people like me, writing correctives and saying if this is where you are getting your history, it's wrong or it's not wrong, it's at least much more complicated than it's being made out to be. >> host: while we are talking about this point of being more complicated, let's say they have very good copy editors who went back and said instead of the founders, many of the founder said something or most of the founders or it was a common opinion at the time. with that simple change
it will end up? >> well, i think all through the election season, all they ever talk about was leaving afghanistan, but this is real. this was a very big deal this week and a very big change. u.s. troops will be in an advise and train -- that's all they'll be doing come spring. >> pulling back from the front lines. >> pulling back from the front lines. they will be with afghan forces. the president has not announced how fast they'll draw down but i suspect by the end of this year we could be down to 30,000 troops. we're 66,000 troops now, possibly down to 30,000 and when we really draw down in 2014, when we are no longer doing combat missions, i think you'll see anywhere from only 6,000 to 9,000 and the important thing to remember about that, george, is two details. tail means the enablers, the support, we would really have if we had 3,000 troops there, we would really have only 800 trigger pullers. you'll see a lot of counterterrorism action, all of those things joe biden talked about a long time ago. i think that's all we'll have there in the future. >> senator corker, are you comfor
to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected country, it's sensitive to public criticism if you look at the train accident, which is their version of twitter, disciplined the party chief who was in charge of building up the railways. this guy who was seen as a god is on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world to people who are at the with him of the police chief or minorities or the terrible status that women are treated in much of the developing world. people have cameras. you can now anonymously report things. you can imagine a network where a bad thing is occurring. you can report it anonymously. you can have anonymous responders. you can build those kind of networks and they're in development now. the fact that everybody is connected has a large number of step functions and improvement there. think about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care and people sort of snickered when the gentleman mentioned to it, the f.d.a. just approved the first
and haurlting deportation of illegal immigrants just prior to the election. in the wall street journal he explains why republicans must embrace immigration reform. 70 percent of the 12 and a half latino voters cast votes for the president in the last election. quote, i think it's a rhetoric by a handful of voices in minority but loud nonetheless that allowed conservatives are anti hispanic and anti immigration. i don't think there's a lot of concern in this country that will somehow get over run by ph.d.'s and entrepreneurs. marco rubio sees this as a gateway issue for hispanic voters that could lead to migration for the republican parties if successful. if they want to over hall they need to convince big labor to go on board. >>> thanks so much. >> now it is my turn. >> thank you, jennifer. immigration will be the only tough fight ahead. president obama's promise he will tackle gun control in his second term and something that has already drawn fierce criticism. two of the cabinet picks will face confirmation battle. he will have to negotiate on the debt ceiling and see queststration. he
election. a dramatic -- dramatic element in his success and obviously the republican party recognizes it's harsh language, some rhetoric used by mitt romney and other republicans around the country didn't help its chance of gaining support within that community. john boehner, the speaker of the house, has said that they need to have a more practical, a more pragmatic approach to this issue, so i think in many ways the white house feels confidently that -- that it has the lead on this issue right now and that it has the public on its side as well. >> all right. nbc's peter alexander with that latest development. thank you so much, peter. i want to bring in the political reporter for slate and msnbc contributor. dave, what do you think about this? it's called comprehensive immigration reform, so is this a surprise at all? >> oh, it's not a surprise. it was a promise that president obama made when he was elected the first time. >> right. >> the worry i think if you're an advocate for this is when you read stories about who might support this. you don't see many house republicans being quote
and the prosperities that we have gained. in the past many years. we also discussed the issue of election in afghanistan and the importance of elections for the afghan people with the hope that we'll be conducting a free and fair election in afghanistan where our friends in the international community and particularly the united states will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course. where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detai
. what about mature democracies? we just had an election in this country. did that teach any lessons? were there any technology lessons to be drawn from this year's election? >> it is always hard to reason. the winners get to write history. the losers think about the next election. there is no question the obama campaign had a technology strategy that helped elect the president. there were targeted programs to get out the vote. to me, the way to say this is governments are going to change, too, because governments spend an awful lot of time delivering service, and now we can measure them. if you ask me to donate money, we can now check to see if that money actually got their. another check and balance on the corruption-major things. we can test the effectiveness of programs. to give you some worries some examples. governments can know where people are and figure out what people report that they are doing versus what they are really doing. there are all sorts of worrisome scenarios that you can imagine. the slippery slope. i will give you one in britain. in london, when you're walking
credit quality. well, we have an election two weeks from today, and american voters have a clear choice. are they going to vote for greater government support for such assistance? or are they going to let the private sector manage on its own? and i think there's an indicator of the right way to go, all we have to do is look at north dakota. north dakota where the unemployment rate is 3%, because of all the hydrofracking of oil and natural gas that is going on, on privately held land. every state wants to be like north dakota. and it's interesting that mitt romney would dissolve the decision as to whether to explore on land or not to the individual state, he let each individual state decide. so virginia, for example, the one to look for oil off its coast would be allowed to do so. that was revoked by the obama administration even though it was granted by the bush administration previously. alaska wants to do more oil exploration. everybody wants to get sources of energy in their state. so not going to be able to get the job of getting it out go but also to attract chemical manufacturing
for the rival particularly the base through the elections for the transition where it comes into play the buchanan cabinet telling them what is going on in the buchanan cabinets through the inauguration through the famous april 1st memo where he essentially tells lincoln he will take charge of things if lincoln can't, and finally through his decision to reinforce against the advisers of the cabinet. the decision that begins the process of the mastery of this extraordinary tumultuous cabinets that serves the focal point of my story called abraham lincoln's white house. through the narrative of defense i have a comparative look at both of the inner and outer lives of this extraordinary group of figures, combing through their family papers, their letters, their official records, and what a great luxury it is the root so often to their families for the children they wrote these passages at night in their diary how they have time to do so after worrying about the civil war during the day still remains a mystery to me but life is less distracted in those days. and i am hoping this competiti
, are the nra is spent a lot of money on the elections last cycle and they didn't have to lot to show for it especially if you look at the senate. a lot of their candidates lost and they had a very if we are looking at return on investment they had a very low return on investment. of course, the nra s a strong lobby. the issue here is who s going to represent the voices of the american people in this debate. things that seem like common sense to the american people. they scrub stand that we need to protect people's right to own a gun in their own home and protect themselves but there is something tragically wrong when there is mass slaughter so we have to solve this problem and i think getting -- >> chris: it are you going to launch a campaign. talk about raisin money and big grass roots organization. >> and the thing is bringing the voices in. we need the leadership of the president and i expect the president president to play a strong leadership role. progressive organizations will work in the states and make sure that we have the voice and we wily have the american people and even
iraq should normalize elections with israel for which sentiments face attempts to give him presents in an iraqi court. he did not however manage to stop the extremists who have tracked his sons and killed his two sons for his retaliation for visiting israel. he ran for parliament in one of seidin 2005 but i remember meeting with him in his living room in baghdad in 2000 where he was showing the fact that he had little money to run for re-election and little money with like-minded candidates where all the radical extremists in iraq were receiving copious funds from the quds force from the iranians and he said the iranians called him up and said how would he like $5 million or a similar amount? yes said no thank you, i'm opposed to what you stand for but there were few people in iraq that would turn down a offer like that from whatever source. would happen in iraq was the iranians basically had free run to assert their influence and we did very little to stop them, especially so in 2010. i was just talking about this with them its guy who was one of the great experts in iraq in the wo
and in that race, gun owners made a six-point difference and this that case, we did a poll after the election, and they said that 45% were willing to vote for it. so guns are more acceptable now than they were ten years ago. >> one of the big questions here is who does the nra represent and you do take millions of dollars from people who make gun, and people who make bullet s and all perfectly legal and fine folks. >> well, actually, we get less money from the industry than we would like to get. >> but you get millions of dollars from them. >> so less than we used to. >> so that the criticism out there that the nra and some other gun supporter groups gin up this, that they are going to come take your guns away, because what happens is that the gun sales rise and people go t out, and you know, sort of frighten people into thinking that the guns are going away when in fact members who are sort of friendly to you all who have a-ratings say we have to look at the assault weapons ban and the accusation is that you are ginning up this conversation, because it helps gun sales. >> the two people se
. the election's over. how come we are not hearing more about this? what do we do? >> you know, having a second terms are tough for presidents. we haven't seen much from president obama that really focuses on the economy or jobs. we have been very reactive to what is happening in the headlines, not atippal for a second president. but it is the soft under belly of the obama presidency. at then of the second sterl, if this chidoesn't turn around and unemploint ployment doesn't come down, the obama agenda will be a failure. they are making a huge mistake, trying to beat up on rich people, businesses and small businesses and raise taxes. the result of the policies, eric, is that unemployment will continue to stay high and poverty rates will continue to skyrocket. when you beat up on the rich, you create more poor and you make your budget problem worse because there are more people on welfare than there were before president obama came to office. >> what happened if there were more people on welfare and if the unemployment rate doesn't go down? >> that has to be the primary focus needs to be. there
. and we just had an election. and elections have consequences, alex. and i think the congressman is absolutely right that we are now drifting toward a parliamentary system. but we don't have a parliamentary system. we have a different system. and in our system the results of the election are meaningful. and the results of this election should suggest to democrats and republicans that the president, unless there is some egregious problem, deserves to have his own choices in government. >> alex, let me just say, the senate has the responsibility to advise and consent. and given the filibuster rules you have to find five republicans, and he'll find out quickly who his friends are. people forget that this election, the republicans held the house. although institutionally they have a majority there, given voting rights and the way the districts are created, the president's got to come to grips with that and somehow both sides are going to find their way out of this. it's going to be just two years of being in the ring, exchanging punches. >> but ultimately, jonathan, your take on chuc
the politicians learned from the election when republicans i believe thought they would win not just the white house but the senate and the house of representatives that the public is sending a message and i hope everyone in congress is listening. it's time to get things done. >> put aside the egos, hang them up with a coat, and let's gret things done. >> last question. >> we talk a lot about what democrats want to see pass in the republican house. what's one thing that republicans are asking for that you think democrats could pass through the house and senate and get signed by the president? >> i think there are a number of things. i think we can deal with the fiscal issues in a bipartisan balanced way. you can't just do it with one side doing all the lifting and everybody else getting off scoth free. the president has been trying for two years. we've came close but speaker boehner walked away from the deal. i suspect we're going to have a chance to see a big deal surface again. i hope this time republicans are willing to take it. >> thank you for giving us your time this week. >> we are back
. he already, by the age of 17, is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about, because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas, he goes to georgetown. and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the rhodes fellowship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success
taken place in terms of going from a nonelected representation and articulation of goals to an elected, an elected -- a transitional government and then an elected government both on the national and the local levels. and that's -- you don't see that elsewhere. at least not in as striking a fashion. in the rest of the book, i talk quite a bit about the personality of gadhafi and what motivated him. many people argue that the personalities of of the dictators themselves don't matter. in the case of libya, i don't think that's quite true. gadhafi was a mercurial, i believe a quite intelligent person who had certain fixations and -- [laughter] i'll try to be diplomatic here because i'm -- [laughter] but there's a lot of strangeness there which motivated his behavior in ways which i think or were so bizarre or that many of the people who are looking at this from the u.s. policy side really -- it's not in a way they were accustomed to thinking about things. and that poalzed problems when you -- posed problems when you try to anticipate what he was going to do or respond to him. for example,
of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and hopefully we'll have garnered some support and move forward, so we'll keep sounding that drum beat but tlt be on pause until after january when the new add m*ins -- administrations get all in place, so the problem, this can be really overwhelming, especially if you have not spent a lot of time thinking about this, but i think one of the solutions is just to start with one thing at a time and pick something that resonates for you, whether it's your food or you have kids and you just want to focus on making sure that -- what they're using and taking in is safer, or if it's an area of your life with regard -- we'll talk about this somehow with the fire department or your fire stations or your fire houses or whatever, also reach out to the breast cancer funds, we love questions, we love working with people, we're here to be your resourc
your presence into here city hall. i know the broadcasting world is happy from the election results last night and we can continue to deliver programming for our communities. [applause] and i know we were inspired by the president's words last night when we talked about the importance of diversity and here in san we are no stranger to that language when we celebrate all the different communities we have here in san francisco and the filipino and native american community here in san francisco. we continue to build upon our city's long standing history and celebrate diversity and multiculturalism as a part of our lives and here we celebrating the american indian and enriches the great history of our city. these events are special to us and gives us the opportunity to recognize the unsung heroes whose work goes unnoticed and it's an opportunity to share with the larger community and i would like to thank the native american organizing community and the health center, the health center of santa clara, our office and i would like to make a special note of one of our employees who has
and how our elected officials have bungled a basic business process that most of us handle with ease, it's a must-see "your money" starts right now. >>> america's road to economic recovery is wide open. it's right there in front of us. if our elected officials don't put some major road blocks in the way. i'm ali velshi, this is your money. debt ceilings, budgets and debt ceilings are all you're going to here coming out of washington the next few months and the partisan warfare in washington could put a dent in recovery. the threat is real. the next battle will be another clash over raising the u.s. debt ceiling. the current ceiling was officially hit on december 31st. but like last time. the u.s. treasury is using extraordinary measures to get through about late february or early march. if congress doesn't act by then, the government risks not being able to pay some of its bills. republicans seem to think the debt ceiling is a useful tool to limit how much the government spends, but that is not what the debt ceiling law is supposed to do. it gives the u.s. treasury the flexibility to bor
went through the roof well before the tragedy in connecticut upon the election of president barack obama in november of last year. so, there's a lot of misinformation. the same thing happened when the president and vice president were elected in 2008 and 2009. gun sales went through the roof. there's a lot of misinformation outs there about what the administration wanlts to do, what others want to do and we need everybody to take a deep breath here and come up with a reasonable, sensible approach about how to honor the second amendment and keep our schools and the streets of our cities safe. >> let me ask you one question. very specifically about your father who is now leading this charge. what insights do you have about him either as a man or legislature to help us understand how he is approaching the task of bringing forward a gun proposal? >> well, i can tell you, he's going to do what he and the president have done on every piece of legislation they have approached the last four years. one, bring all the stake holders together and hear them out from the nra to sportsmen to vict
of the legislature, and they going to be jerry brown aficionados until it's time to run for re- election. that is two years. >> so, he's got money and two years and he's going get a lot of calls to quote, unquote, restore funding. >> right. >> that is what you going to hear about, restore funding, not new funding or extra funding but restore funding to past levels, which some might argue was over the top. >> that's right, but we have seen so many painful cuts over the last several years, there is going to be a lot of groups campaigning to get the money back. >> they're already up there. meanwhile. >> the 49ers headed for the national conference championship game for the second straight season. >> that's right, vern glen has all the highlights, as many as we could put in from last night's drumming of the green pay packers. -- green bay packers. >> reporter: good morning, bay area. if you love the san francisco 49ers, you're living a charmed life. the joint here at candle stick park was jumping last night at the expense of the green bay packers. not only did kapernick rush for an nfl play-off, he shatt
the middle class. i just don't see any social policies on the horizon. the election is over, we've heard everything that the candidates had to say. not one said anything intelligent about this is how you rebuild the american middle class. so little tiny book, not all that thick. tells three stories; what doesn't work and why it doesn't work, what does work and why it does work, what could work and how to make it work. >> host: professor gelles, do you come at this from a liberal or a conservative point of view? you mentioned fox news. >> guest: practical. i've worked in policy in washington. i've been a dean of a school of social policy, and i find that purple is my color. and i'm not particularly interested in taking an ideological point of view, i'm interested in results. and the danger of writing a book like this, and i've already discovered it, my extremely liberal friends wish i had never written the book, and my conservative friends wish i didn't want to spend this much of the government's money. if i can tick both sides off and be true to the data, then i've done the work i wanted
willingness elected republican governors? >> one and half million cast for democrats in congress than republicans . guess why republicans control the house because of gerrymandering. >>> and they also control house of congress but the state level people seem to be for more fiscal responsibility. >> yes, they do. you saw it in early wisconsin and scott walker faced down a recall successfully. people like success . you can see it in michigan and wisconsin and other states, yes, when they see good fiscal responsibility they respond positively. >> john, a lot of people in the state level, switching from a income tax to a sales tax, but not on the national level, they don't want to give the feds that much power? >> i toltsly disagree. i don't want the federal government to know how much i make. a national sales tax it is a way of keeping my income private and starving the government -- >> it is easy to forget that the united states was created to avoid taxes. >> last word from emac. unions to walmart. you are not welcome even in the city of 15 percent unemployment. the new union fight that
. thank you so much for being here. we know how busy you with the election just a few days away so a round of applause for all of our vip and special guests. and now at this time we would also like to thank the city and county of san francisco and our community partners. we must acknowledge them. can't do it without them. bank of america, dignity health, miller coors, diamond foods, virgin america, pg&e, and sales force to help to make this civic celebration possible. we thank you. and of course we must recognize the giants broadcast partner sports bay area that brings sports to our giants fans all season long and made it possible for this to be watched all over northern california. all right. are you ready now? we can really get it started. [cheers and applause] . i said are you ready? [cheers and applause] it is my pleasure now to introduce two members of the best broadcast team in baseball. please welcome dave fleming and john miller. >> now, all along the parade route this song that echoed through the ballpark and my broadcast partner on the radio dave fleming somehow ha
a lot of money on the elections last cycle. they didn't have a lot to show for it especially if you look at results. a lot of their candidates lost. we are looking at return on their investment they had a low return on investment. they are very strong lobby. think the issue is who is going to remember the voices of the american people in this debate. >> reporter: president obama has said he wants to lay it on some of the proposals his task force gives him in the state of the union address. that task force led by the vice president is going to give president obama their recommendations on tuesday in the state of the union is scheduled for february 12th, one month from yesterday. >> gregg: peter, thanks very much. >> fox news is taking a closer look at the gun control debate with a special hannity airing tonight featuring a studio audience compromised some of the new yorkers who were outed by the journal news for having gun permits. that is at 9:00 p.m. eastern time right here on fox news channel. >> arthel: growing concerns over the shortages of flu vaccines as sick americans are overcrow
elected in our states of utah and west virginia and we became friends, democrat and republican, looking to solve problems. i thought the same would carry over when i got to washington. first of all you have to understand the dynamics of what we're dealing with. as a senator we have -- since i've been there in two years, there has not been a bipartisan caucus where we sit down to talk with our republican colleagues on the other side, unless we do it behind what you see on the day-to-day basis. even think about taking it further, we don't even know our colleagues in congress, the 435. so, this gives a us chance, and no labels gives us a venue to sit down and have meaningful conversation. >> but, you know, to have to do this seems like, you could tell 100 grown men and women, you guys need to talk to each other. >> right. but did you hear what joe just said? i mean can you believe there's not even a venue that allows people to come together to solve problems? the premise is a simple one. joe and i come from a background of problem solving as governors and when you see the dysfunction of co
, ilya, he's not the first president to try to go beyond an election and take what was a victory if terms of a -- in terms of a striking mandate. fdr did it, richard nixon tried it, george bush in his re-election tried it. are there differences here? anything noteworthy here? i mean, obviously, he's trying to get past a resistant congress to a lot of his proposals, and this styying of a lot of his proposals. are you worried about the way he's doing it? >> well, of course, i'm worried about it. this is why we have three branches of government. any president of any party at any time is going to try to expand his powers. the nature of any public official whether you're a low-level bureaucrat or the president to do so. but we have in our constitutional system checks and balances both horizontally in terms of congress and the federal judiciary and vertically with federalism. and if courts enforce those structural protections for our liberties, then we'll be a lot better off. neil: you know, i was just thinking, sabrina, know, of bill clinton when he knew he would be challenged on some of the e
for the program. 1; last year, in the 2012 election cycle, the nra contributed $20 million to federal candidates, people running for congress and for president. gun control groups, $20 million for the nra, $4,000 for the gun control groups and more than 50% of the members of the new congress get an "a" rating for the nra. so that's a sense of the clout that the nra has. i think if anything happens, legislatively, there will be regulatory changes and executive action, if anything happens, it will be smaller, rather than bigger. i think it will be a very hard row to eliminate assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. 40% of all gun sales, there is no background check, maybe if not universal, you will see expansion to that. >> shannon: we will see what recommends out. thank you for the preview of your show. >> you bet. >> shannon: the exclusive interviews and watch "fox news sunday" right after america's news headquarters. chris and leaders of gun groups from both sides tackle the debate over the seconds amendment. you will not want to miss that. folks in beijing are not breathing easy, being to
thing was said prior to president obama's first election, adding that not once in four years has sage gun restriction ever been introduced. >> a famous san francisco 79-year-old watering hole is re-opening next month. the gold dust lounge lot its lease last year. the owner moved to jefferson street. the lounge was scheduled to open last night. opening day, however, is now february 1st. >> just ahead, a cold snap moving in, cornell bernard is live in sonoma county tonight. >> can you feel it? another cold snap is moving in, and petaluma is bundling up tonight, and where are my gloves? we'll have the live report coming up. >> ama: just how cold is it expected to get leigh glaser is up next with the forecast,. >> mike: broncos and ravens got together for a football game and it turned into a track meet. it went to double-overtime. we have >> ama: more cold weather is moving in. at it expected to get even colder tonight and tomorrow. cornell bernard is life in petaluma with how people in the north bay are coping. where are your gloved? reporter: you know what? i left them at home. i left t
unlikely to affect the outcome of the election so just have fun with it. congressman ryan, we begin with your opening statement. >> first of all, i want to thank the college. >> here we go. >> four years ago president obama made a promise that he would bring down unemployment below 6%. >> oh, this guy. >> he said by the end of his first term he would cut the deficit in half. yet he still has not put a single credible plan on the table on how to deal with the debt crisis. >> i'm sorry, martha. martha, with all due respect, thiss
back to f.d.r. and the 1932 election that's how he was able to emerge the wets and the dries and begin to move our country through some understanding of a contentious issue that ultimately has good and bad effects no matter how we sort it out. so make congress relevant. and demand that they do it because what else are they doing to help us out in the trenches? the president win noss matter what. he's already won. he got more votes in colorado as george southerlies said because of the turn toout from this amendment which by the way dwarfed his own vote in my state which he won unexpectedly. the president will be vague. the justice department, i hope they'll continue to be vague. they don't need to tell people how they're going to enforce the law. the laws are on the books. quit whining about we need eric holder to tell us what to do. stop it. we're americans. we know they have prosecutorial discretion. congress can step up. don't whine about the administration. the president's already won. the states could win big. we have a robust debate in colorado right now going on. i talked about t
, in the election process, we are-- they do make several promises to do the right thing. and when they go there, whether they are hepressu're pr us, they don't do the right thing and hence the corruption. >> maybe my definition of corrupt-- that doesn't describe law breaking, things punishable by going to prison so he we may be talking past each other on this. it's difficult to define, charles, what the right thing is. >> the right thing, the right thing? >> should they cut medicare? >> are you serious? we've got-- yes, cut it all. cut it all. i think ben stein, the courage, the political courage to do the right thing. we all know the right thing. >> the american people don't want these programs cut. >> so what? so what? we all know the right thing. here is the problem. everybody wants to keep their little kitty, their part, cut the other guy's part. it's never going to work that way. >> i agree with that. >> neil: let's say we keep going the way we're going where we don't really address spending, we came off the cliff deal, 40-1 and that probably is, i think, a precursor to what we're going to
elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just have to go slowly, they told me, it is my pleasure to introduce the executive director of the rainbow world fund. this organization creates this holiday tree now, this is the 7th year. let's hear for that, 7 years of anything is a long time [ applause ] rainbow world fund was founded 12 years ago, the concept and wanted to think locally but he wanted to act globally. and indeed, he has figured out a way to strengthen the lgbt communit
try to keep an eye out for an elected officials i did see the fire chief walk in and joanne is here. thank you for being here. and now we are going to go back to our regular program because we have several people who have wishes who have spoken words they want to give to you that kind of express their take on the tree of hope. first of all, mention once before but now hear to speak to you alahandro mahe and teaches at the san francisco university and short story edit tore and award winner and here he is. >> thank you. >> you look fabulous. you remind me of my first girlfriend. only she was not as tall. but, i want to thank the mayor lee, and the mayor's office, and jeff, and world rainbow fund and all of you for the invitation to be here tonight. we are so privileged to be able to gather together in community and joy and celebration and hope while so much of the world is plunged in darkness and chaos and war and intolerance. i am honored to read a poem for you tonight. >> the last time that i tried this, i pulled out a parking ticket. i got lucky this time. in spanish, hope, is aran
that was done back in july of last year before the election. it's about how the president of israel largely symbolic position, adamantly opposed an israeli strike because he said, i guarantee you, if it comes to it, the americans are going to do it. so, a lot of the israeli calculation back in september and october when they were thinking about a strike was, no, let's hold off because we have some confidence that the obama administration, if it comes to it, we'll do it. if it's necessary. a lot of the people who supported president obama said, "mark my words. he is a man of his word, he does this quite seriously." then he turns around and appoints perhaps the most prominent skeptic of any kind of military intervention in iran as his defense secretary. if you're sitting in israel, you're wondering just how reliable is the united states and maybe we should go it alone. so, for that reason alone, simply the appointment of chuck hagel is going to make the israelis more skittish and perhaps more prone to act. >> here's the irony. who said that military action against iran could prove catastrophi
of the country. >> the president's comments made before the election did assist in getting a large gay vote to go his way. >> that was a political strategy and it was a political convenience strategy. >> can republicans ignore that development? >> i think so. i think if you look at across these united states 32 states have basically been supportive of traditional marriage. i think that is the prevailing view in the country. and i think it will be the prevailing view in the highest court in the land. >> we'll stay in new jersey. that is our state for the day. governor chris christie is riding a wave of popularity. three quarters of the voters approve of the job he is doing. should new jersey democrats put up a candidate to run against christie. >> i think you always as a party -- it is a blue state. let's not kid ourselves. hats off to governor christie for having the standing he does. if the democratic party in new jersey can't find somebody to run a really serious campaign against him. until sandy came along chris christie did not seem like the superman that he seems today. there were policy dif
fire he was elected a delegate under william c. cox. a volunteer fire company he helped organize a year earlier. february 1863, he replaced the foreman. sawyer and every byway in san francisco, every steep hill, and twisting road. had to stall, wants a strong bloodthirsty vigilante had lived with his family on the top floor of the montgomery block. since the building was erected over a decade earlier. before that you have the baths across the way. he was living here when james king, the self-righteous muckraking editor of the daily evening bulletin was gunned down out front. the shooter was james casey, a former volunteer fireman with a criminal past in the tombs of new york. king brought inside to die was laid out on ed stahle's counter. his huge head, heavy from so much brain, wolf to one side as he walked. as he lay dying, his head lay over the bursting table. when king died in room 297 of the montgomery block, every born vigilance committee alleged casey and set the city of flying. ed stahle still held strong opinions. he was figures opposed wind number of his patrons, especially th
or documentary. next year will have municipal elections. it will be 20 years since he stepped down. so that's sort of a good time to pitch to people to get money to do it. maybe someday. >> good, good. as for the music stuff, it's partly why i had to leave detroit to actually write the book because part of me wanted to read every book about detroit. i could've done a whole book about the music, a whole book about coleman young. so sorry to disappoint you, there's not that much music in the boat. there's a little bit about detroit techno music because i ended up living on this block where they basically invented techno music, so that was another story has stumbled onto. i talked to older guys around, talked the last surviving people , but i do a lot of music writing for "rolling stone" and i just wanted to do something different with this one. >> is there a single character in your book does more inspirational than any other? [inaudible] more inspirational than any other. that's a good question. i thought the firefighters that i spent time with in highland park -- i spent time with these fir
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